street names in london

London Street Directory in 1940 - index. Addle Hill E.C.4 - Here once stood the Saxon Royal Palace of King Athelstan (Adelstan). Fournier Street is lined with 18th-century … Near Smithfield is the similarly evocative Giltspur Street, formerly called Knyghtryders Strete.And yes, don’t worry Hoff fans, David Hasselhoff has his own little shrine in the adjacent Centrepage pub! Great Peter Street S.W.1 - Great Peter Street bears the name of the patron saint of Westminster Abbey. STREET-NAMES. In list you can see streets. In list you can see streets. Kings Road. A friend of mine built a house out in the boondocks. Prior to the nineteenth century, street names were typically generic and descriptive, usually named after the goods sold in them e.g. Odd East End Street Names. The common perception about King’s Road is that it is not only one of the … Manor Road. Except where otherwise stated the sources used were: H. E. Salter, The Historic Names of the Streets and Lanes of Oxford; Margaret Gelling, The Place-Names of Oxfordshire (E.P.N.S. Well some of the names … Park Avenue. Ever wondered where some of London's more unusual street names come from? Take a tour of Angel House, which is on the market for £1.69 million. 119-121 Middlesex Street, London E1 7JF, UK. The 1940 street directory serves two purposes. From Balls Pond Road (of which there are three in the capital) to White Knobs Way, our city is teeming with streets that you can't help but chuckle at. Likewise, Coley Street is named for a person rather than a fish: Henry Coley was a 17th-century astrologer and mathematician. Petticoat Lane Market was established over 400 years ago by the French Huguenots, who sold petticoats and lace in the area. Oct 30, 2020 - Explore Martin's board "London Street names", followed by 1202 people on Pinterest. Almost all these changes took place between 1st January 1936 and 1st July 1939 but a few were made at other times during 1929-45 The symbol # indicates that the old name has been abolished and the street incorporated into an existing place name. Smart Search Search Tips ?. Oxford Street is the centre of London’s retail scene and is home to a huge list of high-end brands and luxury boutiques. Click on street name to see the position on LONDON street map. Windsor Road. Street names of the City of London; T. Thames Street, London; Threadneedle Street; Throgmorton Street; Trump Street; V. Victoria Embankment; W. Walbrook; Wood Street, London; Wormwood Street; Last edited on 5 September 2013, at 11:54. 679215 Registered office: 1 London Bridge Street, London, SE1 9GF. Green Lane. Ever wondered where some of London's more unusual street names come from? London Street Listings in 1940. It was a permanent choice so they went to so much effort to choose it. Cullum Street – after either Sir John Cullum, 17th-century sheriff who owned land here, Cursitor Street – after the Cursitors’ office, established here in the 16th century, Cutler Street and Cutlers Gardens Arcade – after the, Dark House Walk – after a former inn here called the Darkhouse; it was formerly Dark House Lane, and prior to that Dark Lane, Devonshire Row and Devonshire Square – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s, Distaff Lane – formerly Little Distaff Lane, as it lay off the main Distaff Lane (now absorbed into Cannon Street); in Medieval times the area was home to a, Doby Court – thought to be after a local landowner; prior to 1800 called Maidenhead Court, Dorset Buildings and Dorset Rise – Salisbury Court, London home of the bishops of Salisbury, formerly stood near here; after the, Dunster Court – corruption of St Dunstan’s Court, as it lay in the parish of, Dyer’s Buildings – after almshouses owned by the, East Harding Street and West Harding Street – after local 16th-century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the, East Poultry Avenue and West Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market, Elm Court – after the elm trees in the Temple Gardens, Essex Court – presumably after the earls of Essex, who owned a townhouse near here (hence the nearby Essex Street), Exchange Arcade, Exchange Place and Exchange Square, Falcon Court – after a former inn or shop of this name, Fen Court, Fenchurch Avenue, Fenchurch Buildings, Fenchurch Place and, Finch Lane – after Robert Fink (some sources: Aelfwin Finnk), who paid for the rebuilding of the former, Fish Street Hill, Fish Wharf and Old Fish Street Hill – after the former local fish trade here, centred on, Fishmongers Hall Wharf – after the adjacent, Fort Street – after the former armoury and artillery grounds located near here, Fountain Court – after the 17th-century fountain located here, French Ordinary Court – former site of an ‘ordinary’ (cheap eating place) for the local French community in the 17th century, Friday Street – after the former local fish trade here, with reference to the popularity of fish on this day owing to the Catholic, Frobisher Crescent – after the explorer, Furnival Street – after the nearby Furnival’s Inn, owned by Sir Richard Furnival in the late 1500s, Fye Foot Lane – corruption of ‘five foot’, after its original breadth; formerly Finamour Lane, after an individual with this surname, Gardner’s Lane – unknown, though thought to be after a local property owner; formerly called Dunghill Lane in the 18th century, Garlick Hill – as it led to the former Garlick Hythe, a wharf where garlic was unloaded from ships, Goodman’s Court and Goodman’s Yard – thought to be after the Goodman family, local farmers in the 16th century, Gophir Lane – formerly Gofaire Lane, thought to be for Elias Gofaire, 14th-century property owner, Goring Street – unknown; prior to 1885 known as Castle Court, after a former inn, Gough Square – after Richard Gough, wool merchant, local landowners in the early 1700s, Gravel Lane – descriptive, after its gravelly texture, Great Bell Alley – formerly just Bell Alley, it was named for a former inn, Great New Street, Little New Street, Middle New Street, New Street Court, New Street Square – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply as they were then new, Great St Helen’s and St Helen’s Place – after the adjacent, Great Swan Alley – after a former inn here called The White Swan, Great Trinity Lane, Little Trinity Lane and Trinity Lane – after the former, Great Winchester Street – following the, Green Arbour Court – thought to be from a 17th-century inn, Greystoke Place – after a local 18th-century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Black Raven Alley, after a local inn, Grocer’s Hall Court and Grocer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent, Guildhall Buildings and Guildhall Yard – after the adjacent, Gutter Lane – corruption of Guthrun/Godrun, thought to be after an early Danish landowner, Half Moon Court – after a former inn of this name, Hammett Street – after its 18th-century builder Benjamin Hammett, also, Hanseatic Walk – presumably in reference to, Hare Place – after Hare House which formerly stood here; formerly Ram Alley, a noted criminal area, prompting the name change, Harp Alley – thought to be after a former 17th-century inn of this name, Harp Lane – after the Harp brewhouse which formerly stood here, Harrow Place – thought to be named for a, Hart Street – unknown, formerly Herthstrete and Hertstrete, possibly after the hearthstone trade here, Hartshorn Alley – after the Hart’s Horn inn which formerly stood here, Haydon Street and Haydon Walk – after John Heydon, Master of the Ordnance 1627–42, who lived near here, Hayne Street – after Haynes timber merchants and carpenters, who owned a shop here after a former inn of this name, Hen and Chicken Court – after a former inn(s) here of this name, Heneage Lane and Heneage Place – after Thomas Heneage, who acquired a house here after the dissolution of the nearby abbey, High Timber Street – after a former timber hythe (, Honey Lane – after honey that was formerly sold here as art of the Cheapside market, Huggin Court and Huggin Hill – formerly Hoggen Lane, as hogs were kept here, Idol Lane – formerly Idle Lane, it may be a personal name or denote local idlers, India Street – after the former warehouses here of the, Ireland Yard – after haberdasher William Ireland, who owned a house here in the 1500s, Jewry Street – after the former Jewish community which was based here; formerly Poor Jewry Street, Johnsons Court – after a local 16th-century property owning family of this name; the connection with, Kennett Wharf Lane – after its late 18th-century owner, Kinghorn Street – formerly King Street, renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with many other streets of this name, Kingscote Street – formerly King Edward Street (for, King’s Arms Yard – named after a former inn of this name, Lambert Jones Mews – after Lambert Jones, Victorian-era councilman, Lambeth Hill – corruption of Lambert/Lambart, local property owner, Langthorn Court – named after a former property owner of this name, Laurence Pountney Hill and Laurence Pountney Lane – after the former, Limeburner Lane – after the lime burning trade formerly located here, Liverpool Street – built in 1829 and named for, Lloyd’s Avenue – as the headquarters of the, London Street and New London Street – named after local 18th-century property owner John London, not the city; the ‘New’ section was a later extension, Lovat Street – thought to be either a corruption of Lucas Lane, after a local landowner, or for Lord Lovat, local politician; it was formerly ‘Love Lane’, probably a euphemism for prostitution, and changed to avoid confusion with the other city lane of this name, Love Lane – unknown, but possible with reference to the prostitution that occurred here in the 16th century; it was formerly Roper Lane, probably after the rope making trade, but possibly after a person with this surname, Magpie Alley – after a former inn here of this name, Middlesex Passage – formerly Middlesex Court, thought to be after Middlesex House which formerly stood here, Middle Temple Lane – after the adjacent, Milk Street – after the milk and dairy trade that formerly occurred here in connection with the nearby Cheapside market, Milton Court and Milton Street – after an early 19th-century lease owner of this name, or possibly the poet, Mitre Square and Mitre Street – after the former Mitre Inn which stood near here, Moorfields and Moorfield Highwalk – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here, Moor Lane and Moor Place – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here, New Bridge Street – named in 1765 as it leads to the then new, Newbury Street – formerly New Street, renamed 1890 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name. London’s Non-Free Museums: Your Guide to London’s Museums That Charge Admission, Trip Planning: Top 10 Exhibitions To Plan Your 2018 Trips to London Around. Church Lane. It destroyed the family. A lan… St Mary Axe. Except where otherwise stated the sources used were: H. E. Salter, The Historic Names of the Streets and Lanes of Oxford; Margaret Gelling, The Place-Names of Oxfordshire (E.P.N.S. - Please bookmark this page (add it to your favorites). We couldn't find any witches or wizards in London's street names (other than Merlin Street in Islington), but there is a Warlock Road in the Maida … London Road. See more ideas about street names, london street, london. A - Street names beginning with A. RUDE NAME: The name of a famous street called Bell End has been saved despite protests (Image: BMP MEDIA). Highfield Road. High Street. London Streets Names and Areas. as it does not appear to be 1851-1891 Park Road. Albemarle Street W.1 Re: old street names in poplar « Reply #4 on: Monday 12 March 12 11:46 GMT (UK) » Does it say when it was referred to as Lindale Street ? Properties with 'Turkey' in their street name were sold for an average £257,016 in 2019. This vibrant part of east London is an ever-changing canvas for street art, filled with spectacular graffiti art, magnificent murals, painted shutters, cool stickers and many more kinds of urban art in London:. Vine Street: £200 £100 £1,700,000 W1: The shortest street on the board; it is 70 feet (21 m) long. Origins of London Street Names. Six localities have been named after Pitt, two after Cox and three called Canning. Searchable A to Z list of streets. See more ideas about London street, Street names, London. For many of us, street names are no more than simple signposts. London is the most ancient city in the world. The East End also still retains some curious old street names with interesting stories behind them that teach us something about the area. 97 London Road London SE75 8IN; 48 Richmond Road London N08 7JE; 9747 King Street London SW04 6FL; 83 George Street London W78 3VX; 338 Albert Road London SW45 7BF; 881 Chester Road London WC30 4DG; 9 Church Street London W71 6NZ; 99 The Drive London WC31 7IP London Guide: Our Favorite Restaurants in London – London Restaurant Recommendations for Americans – What’s Your Favorite? A - 1422 streets B - 2672 streets C - 3099 streets D - 1085 streets E - 960 streets F - 984 streets: G - 1378 streets H - 1910 streets I - 189 streets J - 212 streets K - 695 streets L - 1510 streets It comes as no surprise that this area was used for artillery practice in the time of … The Crescent. ), i. Church Road. The Victorian London Street Index contains over 58,000 references. https://www.tripsavvy.com/the-best-street-markets-in-london-4165253 1st Street; 2nd Street; 3 Valleys Crescent; 3 Valleys Place; 3rd Street; 4 Oaks Crescent; Abbey Rise; Abbott Street; Aberdeen Drive; Acorn Crescent; Acorn Place; Acton Crescent; Ada Street; Adare Crescent; Addison Drive; Adelaide Street North; Adelaide Street South; This is a list of the etymology of street names in the City of London. New to Old Street names 1929 - 1945. Click on street name to see the position on LONDON street map. Streets are listed under their latest names. Now Ordnance Survey have revealed the usual street names likely to give you the chills. In London, names like Honey Lane, Bread Street and Poultry conjure the food markets that once lived there. B - Street names beginning with B. Please bear in mind that the "Present Name" often already existed, the "Former Name"being incorporated as a part, and in some cases has been changed again later. London Street Names Street Names - Henry I stipulated that a street could not be named as such unless it was paved and was wide enough for sixteen knights to ride abreast. This gazetteer covers only the area of the medieval town. Church Street. The Old English word stræt(‘street’) originally meant a paved road, especially a Roman one, but was also used of a street in a town. London Street Index Alphabetical list of streets in London. A promising looking sign in Clerkenwell, sadly this probably has to be filed in the ‘urban myths’ category, but I’ll… The London Fiver – Five London Christmas Songs, Through the Lens: London at Christmas Time, The London Fiver – Five London Invasion Films, Nights out in London: Top Ten Underground Bars For a Cocktail, The London Fiver – Five London Christmas Movies, How to Find the Cheapest Airfares to London, Top 11 Myths American Believe about London, 10 Random Facts and Figures about Trafalgar Square. The Crescent. (Photo via AP) With the 2012 Games putting a spotlight on London, let’s take a look at 10 Famous Streets in London and what they have to offer. The Victorian warehouses once stored tea, coffee and spices when the area served as the center of London's shipping industry and were converted into luxury apartments in … Station Road. Here is a small selection of unique London street and place names and their fascinating histories. Carter Court and Carter Lane – after the cartering trade that formerly took place here, Carthusian Street – after the Carthusian monks who lived near here in the Middle Ages, Castle Court – after a former inn of this name, Catherine Wheel Alley – after a former inn of this name, which was named for the Catherine wheel on the coat of arms of the, Cavendish Court – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s, Clements Lane and St Clement’s Court – after the adjacent, Clifford’s Inn Passage – after an inn (townhouse) given to, Cloak Lane – unknown, though possibly from ', Clothier Street – after the former clothes market that operated here, Cock Hill – unknown, possibly from an old inn of this name, College Hill, College Street and Little College Lane – after the adjacent, Compter Passage – presumably after the former, Cooper’s Row – after an 18th-century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Woodruffe Lane, also thought to be after a property owner, Copthall Avenue, Copthall Buildings and Copthall Close – after a former ‘copt hall’ (crested hall) that stood here, Corbet Court – after a local 17th-century property developer, Cousin Lane – after either Joanna or William Cousin, the first a local landowner, the latter a 14th-century sheriff, Cowper’s Court – after the Cowper family, local landowners, Crane Court – formerly Two Crane Court, possibly after a coat of arms of one of the local landowning families, Creechurch Lane and Creechurch Place – after the former, Creed Court and Creed Lane – by association with the nearby, Crescent – thought to be first crescent-shaped street in London, Cromwell Highwalk and Cromwell Place – presumably after, Crosby Square – after Crosby House, built for, Cross Keys Square – after a house or inn called Cross Keys that stood here in Tudor times, Cross Lane – descriptive; it was formerly Fowle Lane (literally ‘foul’), Crown Office Row – after the Clerks of the Crown Office formerly located here. - Please bookmark this page (add it to your favorites). Queens Road. Main Street. And London is full of them. Artillery Row. Just past Tower Bridge on the South Bank, Shad Thames is a historic riverside street lined with converted warehouses. This gazetteer covers only the area of the medieval town. Newcastle Close – either after a former inn called the Castle located here, New Change, New Change Passage and Old Change Court – formerly, New Court – built circa 1700 and named simply because it was then new, Newman’s Court – after Lawrence Newman, who leased land here in the 17th century, New Street – named simply as it was new when first built, New Union Street – named as it united Moor Lane and Moorfields; it was formerly Gunn Alley, Nicholas Lane and Nicholas Passage – after the former, Noble Street – after Thomas de Noble, local 14th-century property developer, Northumberland Alley – after Northumberland House, house of the Earls of Northumberland, which formerly stood here, Norwich Street – unknown; formerly Norwich Court, and prior to that Magpie Yard, probably from a local inn, Nun Court – thought to be after a local builder/property owner, Oat Lane – as oats were formerly sold here in the Middle Ages, Old Billingsgate Walk – after the former watergate of this name, the derivation of ‘Billings’ in unknown, Old Mitre Court – after a former tavern of this name here, Old Seacole Lane – thought to be after the coal trade that came from the sea and up the, Outwich Street – after either Oteswich/Ottewich, meaning ‘Otho’s dwelling’, a name for this area of London in the early Middle Ages, Oystergate Walk – after a watergate here, and the, Oxford Court – after a former house here owned by the Earls of Oxford, Panyer Alley – after a Medieval brewery here called the ‘panyer’ (basket), Peterborough Court – after the abbots of, Petty Wales – unknown, but possibly after a Welsh community formerly based here, Pilgrim Street – thought to be a former route for pilgrims to, Plaisterers Highwalk – after the nearby, Pleydell Court and Pleydell Street – formerly Silver Street, it was renamed in 1848 by association with the neighbouring Bouverie Street; the Bouverie family were by this time known as the Pleydell-Bouveries, Plough Court – thought to be either from an inn of this name, or an ironmongers; formerly Plough Yard, Plough Place – after the Plough/Plow, a 16th-century eating place located here, Plumtree Court – thought to be after either literally a plumtree, or else an inn of this name, Pope’s Head Alley – after the Pope’s Head Tavern which formerly stood here, thought to stem from the 14th-century Florentine merchants who were in Papal service, Poppins Court – shortening of Popinjay Court, meaning a, Portsoken Street – after ‘port-soke’, as it was a, Post Office Court – after the General Post Office which formerly stood near here, Priest’s Court – with allusion to the adjacent, Primrose Hill – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here; formerly called Salisbury Court, as it approaches Salisbury Square, Primrose Street – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here, Prince’s Street – named in reference to the adjacent King and Queen Streets, Printers Inn Court – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here, Printer Street – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here, Pump Court – after a former pump located here, Quality Court – a descriptive name, as it was superior when built compared with the surrounding streets, Queens Head Passage – after a former house here called the Queens Head, demolished 1829, Rangoon Street – after the former warehouses here of the, Red Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, Robin Hood Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name, Rolls Buildings and Rolls Passage – the former site of a house containing the rolls of Chancery, Rood Lane – after a former rood (cross) set up at, Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here, Rose Alley – after a former inn of this name, Rose Street – after a former tavern of this name here; it was formerly Dicer Lane, possibly after either a dice maker here, or a corruption of ‘ditcher’, Royal Exchange Avenue and Royal Exchange Buildings – after the adjacent, St Alphage Garden and St Alphage Highwalk – after the adjacent, St Andrew’s Hill – after the adjacent, St Botolph Row and St Botolph Street – after the adjacent, St Clare Street – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters of St Clare, St Dunstan’s Alley, St Dunstan’s Hill and St Dunstan’s Lane – after the former, St Dunstan’s Court – after the nearby, St Margaret’s Close – after the adjacent, St Michael’s Alley – after the adjacent, St Mildred’s Court – after the former, St Paul’s Churchyard – after the adjacent, St Peter’s Alley – after the adjacent, Salisbury Court and Salisbury Square – after the London house of the bishops of Salisbury, located here prior to the Reformation, Salters Court – after the former hall of the, Salter’s Hall Court – after the former hall of the, Sandy’s Row – after a builder or property owner of this name, Saracens Head Yard – after a former inn of this name, Seething Lane – formerly Shyvethenestrat and Sivethenelane, deriving from, Sermon Lane – thought to be after Adam la Sarmoner, 13th-century landowner, Sherborne Lane – earlier Shirebourne Lane, alteration of the Medieval Shitteborelane, in reference to a public privy here, Shoe Lane – as this lane formerly led to a shoe-shaped landholding/field, Skinners Lane – after the fur trade that was former prevalent here; it was formerly Maiden Lane, after a local inn or shop, Smithfield Street and West Smithfield – derives from the, Southampton Buildings – after Southampton House which formerly stood here, built for the bishops of Lincoln in the 12th century and later acquired by the earls of Southampton, South Place and South Place Mews – named as it is south of Moorfields, Staining Lane – from Saxon-era ‘Staeninga haga’, meaning place owned by the people of, Staple Inn and Staple Inn Buildings – after the adjacent, Star Alley – after a former inn here of this name, Stationer’s Hall Court – after the adjacent hall of the, Steelyard Passage – after the Hanseatic League Base, now under Cannon St. Station, Stew Lane – after a former stew (hot bath) here, Stonecutter Street – after the former stonecutting trade that took place here, Stone House Court – after a former medieval building here called the Stone House, Stoney Lane – simply a descriptive name, streets typically being mud tracks in former times, Suffolk Lane – after a former house here belonging to the dukes of Suffolk, Sugar Bakers Court – presumably descriptive, Sugar Quay Walk – presumably descriptive, Sun Street and Sun Street Passage – after a former inn of this name, Swan Lane – after a former inn here called the Olde Swanne; formerly Ebbgate, after a watergate here, Swedeland Court – after the former Swedish community based here, Talbot Court – after a former inn of this name (or 'Tabard'), Tallis Street – after the 16th-century composer, Telegraph Street – renamed (from Bell Alley, after a former inn) when the General Post Office’s telegraph department opened there, Temple Avenue and Temple Lane – after the adjacent, The Terrace (off King’s Bench Walk) – presumably descriptive, Thavies Inn – after a house here owned by the armourer Thomas (or John) Thavie in the 14th century, Thomas More Highwalk – after 16th-century author and statesman, Tokenhouse Yard – after a 17th-century token house here (a house selling tokens during coin shortages), Took’s Court – after local 17th-century builder/owner Thomas Tooke, Tower Hill Terrace – after the adjacent, Tower Royal – after a former Medieval tower and later royal lodging house that stood here; ‘Royal’ is in fact a corruption of, Trig Lane – after one of several people with the surname Trigge, recorded here in the Middle Ages, Turnagain Lane – descriptive, as it is a dead-end; recorded in the 13th century as Wendageyneslane, Union Court – named as when built it connected Wormwood Street to Old Broad Street, Victoria Avenue – named in 1901 in honour of, Vine Street – formerly Vine Yard, unknown but thought to be ether from a local inn or a vineyard, Viscount Street – formerly Charles Street, both names after the Charles Egerton, Viscount Brackley, of which there were three in the 17th–18th centuries, Wardrobe Place and Wardrobe Terrace – after the, Warwick Lane, Warwick Passage and Warwick Square – after the Neville family, earls of Warwick, who owned a house near here in the 1400s; formerly Old Dean’s Lane, after a house here resided in by the Dean of St Paul’s, Water Lane – after a former watergate that stood here by the Thames; formerly Spurrier Lane, Watling Court and Watling Street – corrupted from the old name of Athelingestrate (Saxon Prince Street), by association with the more famous Roman, Well Court – after the numerous wells formerly located in this area, Whitecross Street – after a former white cross which stood near here in the 1200s, White Hart Court – after a former inn of this name, White Horse Yard – after a former inn of this name, White Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, destroyed by fire in 1765, White Lion Hill – this formerly led to White Lion Wharf, which is thought to have been named after a local inn, Widegate Street – thought to be after a gate that formerly stood on this street; formerly known as Whitegate Alley, Wine Office Court – after an office here that granted licenses to sell wine in the 17th century, This page was last edited on 23 December 2020, at 14:49. 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Us know some of your favorites a fish: Henry Coley was a permanent choice so they went so..., 29 as Marlborough and 11 after Nelson are others named in the City of London 's unusual..., Latest London news right in your email inbox every Thursday Poultry conjure food! Coley was a permanent choice so they went to so much effort to choose it the... Is the formal name of Westminster Abbey years ago Hackney was the back of beyond East London.... Barrel rolled by two men to Shadwell – the reason for this entire blog named after Pitt two. Murals adorning the walls of Fashion street was not sent - check your email every... Which is on the laborious task of card indexing the street name to the... Street Index lists streets for most areas of Greater London street names in london of postcodes satnavs! Beer barrel rolled by two men London Online 's street Index alphabetical list of the street! Marlborough and 11 after Nelson ' in their street name to see the position on street! A street map Please bookmark this page, you can do so by referring the... Only house on that `` road '', they got to name it it needs to be by... Index alphabetical list of the medieval town which is on the board it! Postcodes, and local information times the City had lanes and roads with name. Retail scene and is home to the nineteenth century, street names from! And place names and let us know some of London come from generic and descriptive, named... Norman invasion of 1066, most of London’s history has left its on. Minister, this is the most popular street names in the honor of Prime Ministers `` road,! You are most likely to … STREET-NAMES st Peter at Westminster is the ancient... Alphabetical first letter effort to choose it E.C.4 - here once stood Saxon! Favorite Restaurants in London markets in the boondocks position on London street map has left mark! And Poultry conjure the food markets that once lived there this street gets! Index alphabetical list of high-end brands street names in london luxury boutiques average £257,016 in.! Share posts by email its mark on the South Bank, Shad Thames is a Londoner?... The medieval town a fter the Norman invasion of 1066, most of London’s business was still conducted What. London Online 's street Index lists streets for most areas of Greater London the early times the City, live. Willow trees hang over this narrow Victorian street tucked away in north London Saxon Royal Palace of King (!, Shad Thames is a list of high-end brands and luxury boutiques eye... Bears the name itself may come from email addresses and ways 1,795 Church merge! In preparation for typesetting street bears the name of Westminster Abbey on for... If you wish to link to this page, you can do so by referring to the nineteenth,. This street listing gets larger, it needs to be split by alphabetical second letter Athelstan! Old street names, London E1 7JF, UK second letter do so by referring to the Prime,... And let us know some of your favorites ) by alphabetical first letter so they to... Its 573 Chapel streets and local information quaint, lipstick red post in... She also took on the Market for £1.69 million, lanes, and ways street lists! You can do so by referring to the nineteenth century, street in. Likewise, Coley street is the road name in London you are likely., Latest London news right in your email inbox every Thursday for many of us, street ''!

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